International Focus

‘A Second Chance for Europe’: Prof Jozef Ritzen offers solutions to anti-EU feelings

‘A Second Chance for Europe’: Prof Jozef Ritzen offers solutions to anti-EU feelings

The rise of populism and discontentment with globalisation has made the European Union seem steadily vulnerable, not only with extreme actions such as the Brexit vote but in more subtle ways, as individuals increasingly feel discontentment with how society is organised and run. To help understand and also counter these ‘anti’ feelings, Jozef Ritzen—honourary professor at Maastricht University among many other distinguished titles—has edited a new book, ‘A Second Chance for Europe.’

What might the UK election mean for Brexit? Prof Luc Soete argues in favour of the EU

What might the UK election mean for Brexit? Prof Luc Soete argues in favour of the EU

The signing of the Maastricht Treaty marked the first step towards the establishment of the European Union (EU) as we know it today. Now, 25 years later, it is time to take stock. Has the EU lived up to expectations? Is it up to the task of addressing the problems of our time – the euro crisis, the refugee crisis, Brexit and rising anti-European populism, with Trump as just the latest variation on this theme? Has the ideal of an integrated Europe become obsolete? If it were up to Luc Soete, professor of International Economic Relations, Brussels should be given more power.

How much does political leaning influence giving, and what does that mean in broader terms?

How much does political leaning influence giving, and what does that mean in broader terms?

In the era of US President Donald Trump and the UK’s vote to exit the EU, many are wondering about intrinsic differences between the right and left and where political preferences come from. In a paper about to be published in Elsevier’s Journal of Economic Behaviour and Organisation, researchers Kaj Thomsson and Alexander Vostroknutov explore this question through the lens of giving: How is sharing shaped by our political inclinations?

The Trump effect on U.S. foreign policy

The Trump effect on U.S. foreign policy

No matter who wins, the 2016 American presidential election will be defined by its rejection of establishment candidates and the electorate’s embrace of insurgents, who openly waged war on their own parties, argues dr. Roberta Haar, an American national teaching at UCM, whose area of research includes investigating U.S. foreign policy.