Research & Analysis

The 2018 UM Star Lectures: in the Sustainability 2.0 era, home is where the health and wealth is

The 2018 UM Star Lectures: in the Sustainability 2.0 era, home is where the health and wealth is

“There are some academics who take the role of preachers when it comes to sustainability, who just reiterate that we must be sustainable,” SBE professor of real estate finance Piet Eichholtz observes. “We take a more pragmatic approach and say, well, let’s see if sustainability pays, in monetary terms. Because if it does that, you don’t need to be a preacher, you don’t need to have government rules – the market will provide incentives.”

The 2018 UM Star Lectures: Rachel Pownall on appreciating art in the global economy

The 2018 UM Star Lectures: Rachel Pownall on appreciating art in the global economy

The art market, worth about $45 billion globally, is booming. Rachel Pownall, who holds the TEFAF Chair in Art Markets at Maastricht University’s School of Business and Economics, is investigating how shifts in the trade and global economic developments can have an impact on the value of art. Her research is the subject of her 2018 UM Star Lecture.

Blue skies and clear deliverables: how setting targets can boost employees’ creativity

Blue skies and clear deliverables: how setting targets can boost employees’ creativity

Businesses increasingly see the value in inspiring employees to work more creatively – and they’re offering more time and resources for out-of-the-box thinking. Technology giant Google expects staff to spend 80 per cent of their time on routine daily tasks and reserve 20 per cent for more creative work. But for all its popularity, little is known about how well this approach works, Maastricht University academics Alexander Brüggen and Christoph Feichter tell Tracy Brown Hamilton.

New land, new lives, new businesses: refugee entrepreneurs look to the future

New land, new lives, new businesses: refugee entrepreneurs look to the future

All entrepreneurs are inspired by the dream of creating something new. For refugee entrepreneurs, building a business goes hand in hand with building a new life in a new land. How do they establish viable enterprises and find meaningful work for themselves and others? Tracy Brown Hamilton talks to Jarrod Ormiston, assistant professor in social entrepreneurship at Maastricht University’s School of Business and Economics, about his research into these questions.

Giving economics a nudge: Maastricht University academics on Richard H. Thaler and behavioural economics’ rise

Giving economics a nudge: Maastricht University academics on Richard H. Thaler and behavioural economics’ rise

Richard H. Thaler, winner of the 2017 Nobel Prize for Economics, has helped bring behavioural economics in from the fringes of the discipline and introduced its ideas to a broad audience. We talk to Maastricht University School of Business and Economics academics about his impact, the role of behavioural economics in their work, and its place in education at Maastricht University.

How much does political leaning influence giving, and what does that mean in broader terms?

How much does political leaning influence giving, and what does that mean in broader terms?

In the era of US President Donald Trump and the UK’s vote to exit the EU, many are wondering about intrinsic differences between the right and left and where political preferences come from. In a paper about to be published in Elsevier’s Journal of Economic Behaviour and Organisation, researchers Kaj Thomsson and Alexander Vostroknutov explore this question through the lens of giving: How is sharing shaped by our political inclinations?

New rule makes sports more competitive and fun to watch

New rule makes sports more competitive and fun to watch

Sports such as volleyball, badminton and squash can be made more competitive and thrilling to watch if the so-called ‘Catch-Up Rule’ is applied, according to researchers Steven Brams (New York University, US), Mehmet Ismail (UM), Marc Kilgour (Wilfrid Laurier University, Canada) and Walter Stromquist (Swarthmore College, US). Last year, Mehmet Ismail and Professor Steven Brams applied the Catch-Up Rule to the football penalty shootouts.